DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM

Soufiane Ababri

Something New Under The Little Prince's Body

9 Nov 2019 – 1 Feb 2020

OPENING

8 Nov 2019 -PM

English German

DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM are pleased to present our first solo exhibition with SOUFIANE ABABRI (b. Rabat, Morocco, 1985) at the gallery. Titled SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE LITTLE PRINCE’S BODY, it will open on Friday, 08 November, at 6–8 PM. Installed over various tones of flesh-painted walls, the exhibition features a new body of figurative colored-pencil drawings prompting a discourse on sexuality and interracial love among postcolonial-era gays. Ababri, who often stages interventions or workshops, activates the exhibition on opening night with an accompanying performance in the gallery, initiating the relationship and narrative between the Prince and his new lover and featuring body-to-body movements, song, and texts.

DITTRICH & SCHLECHTRIEM freuen sich, die erste Einzelausstellung des Künstlers SOUFIANE ABABRI (geb. 1985 in Rabat, Marokko) in der Galerie zu präsentieren. Die Schau mit dem Titel SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE LITTLE PRINCE’S BODY wird am Freitag, 08. November, 18–20 Uhr eröffnet. Die auf in verschiedenen Fleischtönen gestrichenen Wänden gehängte Ausstellung umfasst eine neue Serie figurativer Buntstiftzeichnungen, die zu einer Auseinandersetzung über Sexualität und Liebe zwischen schwulen Männern verschiedener Hautfarben im postkolonialen Zeitalter anregen. Am Eröffnungsabend aktiviert Ababri, der oft Interventionen und Workshops veranstaltet, die Ausstellung mit einer begleitenden Performance in der Galerie, die mit einem Dialog zwischen bewegten Körpern, Gesang und Texten die beginnende Beziehung und Geschichte zwischen dem Prinzen und seinem neuen Liebhaber zum Leben erweckt.

Framed by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s 1943 novella “Le Petit Prince,” Ababri’s exhibition asks the challenging question of what would have happened if the Aryan-alien blond Little Prince, after arriving on Earth, had met and fallen in love with an Arab man. Saint-Exupéry’s Buch is generally read as a literary fable about friendship and humanity, a critique of the decline of moral values in Western society. Having touched down in the northern Sahara, his Little Prince encounters only the French narrator, whose plane has crashed, and mystical speaking animals—but no natives. It is interesting to note that Saint-Exupéry, a pilot by training, was the station manager of a stopover airfield in Tarfaya in southern Morocco in the late 1920s; as part of his job, he was involved in armed altercations with rebellious Berbers. The hypothesized erotic relationship between the blond Prince and the Arab mirrors the history of immigration to Europe and the struggle of the gay movement in late-1960s France from the complicated and rarely considered perspective of a contemporary gay Arab man.

„Please … could you draw me a sheep!“ That is the famous first sentence the Little Prince addresses to the sleeping author in Saint-Exupéry’s version. In Soufiane Ababri’s drawing series, his wish comes true. Yet the sheet is held by a naked, hairy, “brown” body. And where one would expect to see a sheep’s head, the gleaming head of a penis juts out from the wool, as an erotic allusion to circumcision, halal slaughter, and sacrificial rites. But who is sacrificing himself to whom in this scene? As the exhibition’s title suggests, the question of dominance is indeed operative: Which body lies under which other body, who fucks whom—or who desires to be penetrated by whom?

Ababri equates sexual with cultural dominance and submission. That he as an artist would also construe an inextricable linkage between the histories of postcolonial and homosexual as well as feminist liberation, effectively declaring the one form of freedom to be dependent on the other, might seem odd given the oppression and persecution of gays and women’s rights activists in the Maghreb. It is less odd when one considers the fact that modernity and postwar modernism were not a European project alone but also an African one, that the biased projections of the former colonial powers must be countered by a new canon, a new narrative—an insight that has long become accepted in the art context. Still, in broaching the question of the emancipation of Arab and, ultimately, also of European gays from racist role models, Ababri is an absolute pioneer in the art world. He adopts a position of emphatic powerlessness to tell stories of violence, domination, and marginalization. Quite literally—homosexual acts are still punishable by law in Morocco, homosexuality is virtually nonexistent, and openly gay men are few and far between even in the arts scene. To date, the writer and director Abdellah Taïa, who lives in exile in Paris, remains the country’s only openly gay intellectual.

“Bedworks” is the collective title that Ababri, who lives between Tangier and Paris, has given to the drawings. Since 2016, he has made a habit of working while lying in bed—his rejoinder to the history of European painting from Orientalism to modernism, which rendered women’s, as well as exotic men’s, bodies as “odalisques”: sprawling on a divan like harem slaves, available as objects of desire. Many artists of his generation resort to video, performance art, or sculpture; Ababri, by contrast, signals his rejection of the academic canon by devoting himself to drawing as an intimate and expressive medium. Not having a studio and buying his pencils at the supermarket are conscious choices that match his straightforward and regressive graphic style. The attitude of Ababri’s drawings is pointedly camp. The poses and colors are extroverted and stylized, the constellations in the pictures are reminiscent of 1950s melodramas, but also of Fassbinder’s early films or the exaggerated choreographies in Claire Denis’s Foreign Legion drama “Beau Travail” (1999).

Because Ababri draws lying down, with the paper on a board, everything in his pictures comes out equally flat and without perspectival depth, equally meaningful or meaningless. And yet there is something enormously physical about the works, an impression heightened by the color of the wall on which they are presented in the exhibition. The artist chose a powdery flesh tone of the sort found in pantyhose, underwear both erotic and orthopedic, band-aids, and makeup, a hue that prompts associations of skin, lesions, cosmetic camouflage. In the show, all visitors and the performers are bathed in the light of this “white” skin tone, which comes to be understood to be the Little Prince’s.

What is more, the men in Ababri’s drawings always have rosy cheeks, almost as though they had applied rouge. This conspicuous “blush” marks the instant at which the other’s desire is recognized and the subject loses control of his body, of representation. The same can be said of the picture itself, which, in the conventional understanding of art, is supposed to arouse desire but remain forever passive, stuck in a feminine role—as though it did not perceive or return the beholder’s gaze.

Ababri shatters these conventions. His drawings know that they are being looked at—and so do the men who perform in them. What is less clear is whether their loss of control leads to (potentially consensual) violence, sex, or intimacy. At the same time, Ababri shows the Arab male body in passive, vulnerable, and autoerotic positions, indirectly alluding to the leftist wing of the gay movement and the role of the “front homosexuel d’action révolutionnaire” (FHAR). In the early 1970s, this group around the writer, philosopher, and activist Guy Hocquenghem responded to the Algerian War by calling for sexual encounters between French gays and Arab men, which they believed held emancipatory potential. By allowing themselves to be penetrated, FHAR claimed, white Frenchmen enabled their “Arab” partners to avenge the suffering that France had inflicted on their countries of origin. This argument, however, enshrined its own racist fetishizing view of the Arabs, imposing a role on them that, in the mode of sexual submission, merely reenacted the patriarchal gesture of imperial paternalism.

Ababri’s art is a quest for new, complex, less simplistic images. His drawings resemble arenas in which seemingly irreconcilable extremes and desires clash. The reality of a sexuality that can be lived only “invisibly,” in parks, apartments, or restrooms, encounters the activism of the gay emancipation movements from the late 1960s through punk and the AIDS crisis to the present. Ababri’s visual language may feel blunt, pornographic, positively crude, but it is richly laced with references to gay art and cultural history and gay everyday life both in the Maghreb and in Paris. That it does so without becoming pretentious, that it makes no secret of loneliness and the difficulty of communicating eroticism across boundaries of class, is its great achievement.

The above is a sketch by Oliver Koerner von Gustorf, who will contribute an essay for the gallery catalogue to be published in late November 2019.

Soufiane Ababri lives and works between Paris, France, and Tangier, Morocco. This is the artist’s first solo show with the gallery and in Germany and the culmination of a residency in Berlin in October and November 2019. Ababri has shown widely in Europe, with exhibitions in Paris, Antwerp, Istanbul, London and his hometown of Rabat, Morocco. His work has most recently been acquired the collections of FRAC Poitou-Charentes and MAC/VAL Musée d’art contemporain du Val-de-Marne, Vitry, both in France.

Den Rahmen für Ababris Ausstellung bildet Saint-Exupérys 1943 erschienene Erzählung „Le Petit Prince“. Die Bilder werfen die Frage auf, was geschehen wäre, wenn der arisch-außerirdische blonde kleine Prinz auf der Erde gelandet wäre und sich dort in einen Araber verliebt hätte. Saint-Exupérys Buch gilt gemeinhin als literarische Fabel über Freundschaft und Menschlichkeit, als Kritik am Werteverfall der westlichen Gesellschaft. Sein kleiner Prinz, der in der Nordsahara landet, trifft hier nur den in seinem Flugzeug abgestürzten französischen Ich-Erzähler und mystische sprechende Tiere – jedoch keine Einheimischen. Interessanterweise war der Pilot Saint-Exupéry Ende der 1920er Jahre Leiter eines Zwischenlandeflugplatzes im südmarokkanischen Tarfaya, wo er auch rebellische Berber bekämpfte. Die hypothetische erotische Beziehung zwischen dem blonden Prinzen und dem Araber spiegelt die Geschichte der Einwanderung nach Europa und die Kämpfe der Schwulenbewegung im Frankreich der späten 1960er aus der komplexen und wenig beachteten Perspektive eines schwulen Arabers von heute.

„Bitte … zeichne mir ein Schaf!“ Das ist der berühmte erste Satz, den der kleine Prinz in Antoine de Saint-Exupérys Fassung an den noch schlafenden Autor richtet. In Soufiane Ababris Zeichnungsserie wird ihm dieser Wunsch erfüllt. Allerdings wird das Blatt von einem nackten, behaarten, „braunen“ Körper gehalten. Und dort, wo beim Schaf der Kopf sitzt, leuchtet eine blanke Eichel aus der Wolle hervor, als erotische Anspielung auf Beschneidung, Schächtung und Opferung. Doch wer opfert sich hier dem anderen? Wie der Titel der Ausstellung andeutet, geht es tatsächlich um Dominanz und die Frage, welcher Körper unter wem liegt, wer wen fickt – oder wer von wem als penetrierend begehrt wird.

Ababri setzt sexuelle und kulturelle Dominanz und Unterwerfung gleich. Dass er als Künstler auch die Geschichten postkolonialer und homosexueller wie feministischer Befreiung untrennbar miteinander verbindet, quasi die eine Freiheit von der anderen abhängig macht, erscheint angesichts der Unterdrückung und Verfolgung von Schwulen und Frauenrechtlerinnen im Maghreb zunächst erstaunlich. Und das, obwohl sich im Kunstkontext schon längst die Idee durchgesetzt hat, dass die Moderne und Nachkriegsmoderne nicht nur ein europäisches, sondern auch ein afrikanisches Projekt waren, dass den einseitigen Projektionen der ehemaligen Kolonialmächte ein neuer Kanon, eine neue Narration entgegengesetzt werden muss. Im Hinblick auf die Emanzipation der arabischen und letztendlich auch der europäischen Schwulen von rassistischen Rollenbildern ist Ababri im Kunstbetrieb ein absoluter Pionier. Dabei nimmt er eine Position der betonten Machtlosigkeit ein, um über Gewalt, Dominanz und Marginalisierung zu erzählen. Das ist wortwörtlich gemeint, denn in Marokko ist Homosexualität nach wie vor strafbar, sie existiert quasi nicht, offen Schwule findet man auch im Kulturbetrieb kaum. So ist der im Pariser Exil lebende Schriftsteller und Regisseur Abdellah Taïa der bislang einzige offen schwule Intellektuelle des Landes.

„Bedworks“ heißen Ababris Zeichnungen, die der zwischen Tanger und Paris pendelnde Künstler seit 2016 stets im Bett liegend anfertigt – als Reaktion auf die europäische Malereigeschichte vom Orientalismus bis in die Moderne. Denn die zeigte Frauen- und auch exotische Männerkörper als „Odalisken“, in der Manier von Haremssklavinnen auf einem Divan liegend, als verfügbare Objekte der Begierde. Während viele Künstler seiner Generation auf Video, Performance oder Skulptur zurückgreifen, widmet Ababri sich als Gegenreaktion zum akademischen Kanon der persönlichen und expressiven Zeichnung. Bewusst verzichtet er auf ein Studio, kauft seine Stifte im Supermarkt und entwickelt einen ganz direkten, regressiven Zeichenstil, den man auch aus der Outsider-Art, von Graffiti, Kritzeleien oder aus alten Pornografie-Heften kennt. Die Attitüde von Ababris Zeichnungen ist dabei betont camp. Die Körperhaltungen und Farben sind extrovertiert und stilisiert, die Konstellationen auf den Bildern lassen an Melodramen aus den 1950er-Jahren, aber auch an die frühen Filme von Fassbinder oder die überhöhten Choreografien in Claire Denis’ Fremdenlegionärsdrama „Beau Travail“ (1999) denken.

Dadurch, dass Ababri im Liegen auf einem Brett zeichnet, wird auf den Zeichnungen alles flach und perspektivlos, es gibt keine Tiefe, alles ist gleich bedeutsam oder bedeutungslos. Dennoch wirken die Arbeiten ungeheuer körperlich. Verstärkt wird dieser Eindruck durch die Wandfarbe, auf der sie in der Ausstellung präsentiert werden. Der Künstler wählte einen pudrigen Fleischton, so wie er in Strumpfhosen, erotischer und orthopädischer Unterwäsche, Pflasterstreifen oder in Make-Up vorkommt. Die Farbe weckt Assoziationen von Haut, Verletzungen, kosmetischer Camouflage. In der Ausstellung sind sämtliche Besucher und die Performer in das Licht dieser “weißen” Hautfarbe getaucht, die sich mit dem Kleinen Prinzen verbindet.

Zudem haben die Männer in Ababris Zeichnungen stets rosige Wangen, die fast wie geschminkt wirken. Dieses betonte „Erröten“ bezeichnet den Moment, in dem das Begehren des Anderen erkannt wird und die Kontrolle über den Körper, die Repräsentation verloren geht. Das Gleiche gilt auch für das Bild, das im konventionellen Kunstverständnis zwar Begehren erwecken, aber dabei immer passiv, in einer weiblichen Rolle verbleiben soll – so, als würde es den Blick des Betrachters nicht bemerken oder erwidern.

Ababri bricht mit diesen Konventionen. Seine Zeichnungen wissen, dass sie angeblickt werden – wie auch die Männer, die auf ihnen agieren. Dabei bleibt es unklar, ob der Kontrollverlust zu (auch einvernehmlicher) Gewalt, Sex oder Intimität führt. Zugleich zeigt Ababri den arabischen männlichen Körper in passiven, verletzlichen und autoerotischen Positionen. Dabei spielt er indirekt auf die linke schwule Bewegung und die Rolle des „front homosexuel d’action révolutionnaire“ (FHAR) an. Die Gruppe um den Autor, Philosophen und Aktivisten Guy Hocquenghem propagierte Anfang der 1970er Jahre als Reaktion auf den Algerienkrieg sexuelle Begegnungen zwischen französischen Schwulen und arabischen Männern, weil sie darin emanzipatorisches Potential sah. Indem weiße Franzosen sich penetrieren ließen, so das FHAR-Argument, ermöglichten sie es ihren „arabischen“ Partnern, sich für das Leid zu rächen, das Frankreich ihren Heimatländern zugefügt hatte. Damit wurden die Araber allerdings wieder rassistisch fetischisiert und ihnen eine Rolle zugeschrieben, die im Modus der sexuellen Unterwerfung die imperiale und patriarchale Geste der Bevormundung einfach nur wiederholte.

Ababri sucht in seinem Werk nach neuen, komplexen, weniger plakativen Bildern. Seine Zeichnungen gleichen Arenen, in denen scheinbar unvereinbare Gegensätze und Begehren aufeinanderprallen. Hier trifft die Realität einer Sexualität, die sich nur „unsichtbar“ in Parks, Wohnungen oder Toiletten abspielen kann, auf den Aktivismus der schwulen Emanzipationsbewegungen von den späten 1960er Jahren über Punk und die AIDS-Krise bis in die Gegenwart. Ababris visuelle Sprache mag direkt, pornografisch, geradezu roh wirken, doch sie ist voller Referenzen an die schwule Kunst- und Kulturgeschichte und den schwulen Alltag im Maghreb wie in Paris. Dass sie dabei so unprätentiös bleibt, auch von Einsamkeit und der Schwierigkeit spricht, Erotik zwischen verschiedenen Klassen zu kommunizieren, ist ihre große Leistung.

Diese Skizze stammt von Oliver Koerner von Gustorf. Er wird auch einen Essay für den von der Galerie herausgebrachten Katalog verfassen, der Ende November 2019 erscheinen soll.

Soufiane Ababri lebt und arbeitet in Paris (Frankreich) und Tanger (Marokko). Die erste Einzelausstellung des Künstlers in der Galerie und in Deutschland bildet den Abschluss eines Arbeitsaufenthalts in Berlin im Oktober und November 2019. Ababris Werke waren an vielen Orten in Europa, darunter Paris, Antwerpen, Istanbul und London, sowie in seiner Heimatstadt Rabat (Marokko) zu sehen. Zuletzt wurden Arbeiten für die Sammlungen des FRAC Poitou-Charentes und des MAC/VAL Musée d’art contemporain du Val-de-Marne in Vitry (beide Frankreich) erworben.

insert_drive_file Artist CV
IN SEARCH OF THE LOST REVOLUTION. NOTES ON SOUFIANE ABABRI’S SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE LITTLE PRINCE’S BODY
By OLIVER KOERNER VON GUSTORF

“Homosexuality expresses something—some aspect of desire—which appears nowhere else, and that something is not merely the accomplishment of the sexual act with a person of the same sex. Homosexuality haunts the “normal world”.[…]In its endless struggle against homosexuality, society finds again and again that condemnation seems to breed the very curse it claims to be getting rid of. And for a very good reason. Capitalist society manufactures homosexuals just as it produces proletarians, constantly defining its own limits: homosexuality is a manufactured product of the normal world.”
– Guy Hocquenghem, Homosexual Desire, 1972

AUF DER SUCHE NACH DER VERLORENEN REVOLUTION ANMERKUNGEN ZU SOUFIANE ABABRIS SOMETHING NEW UNDER THE LITTLE PRINCE’S BODY
Von OLIVER KOERNER VON GUSTORF

„Homosexualität bringt etwas vom Begehren zum Ausdruck, das sonst verborgen bleibt – und dieses „etwas“ ist keineswegs bloß der mit einer Person des gleichen Geschlechts vollzogene Geschlechtsakt. Die Homosexualität sucht die ‚normale Welt‘ heim. […] In ihrem unaufhörlichen Kampf gegen die Homosexualität stellt die Gesellschaft stets von Neuem fest, dass ihre Verurteilung eben jene Plage, die sie loszuwerden beabsichtigt, selbst reproduziert. Und dies nicht ohne Grund: Die kapitalistische Gesellschaft erzeugt den Homosexuellen, wie sie den Proletarier produziert, wodurch sie ständig ihre eigenen Schranken hervorbringt.“
– Guy Hocquenghem, Das homosexuelle Begehren, 1972.

It is no coincidence that Stephen Frear’s film My Beautiful Laundrette (1985), one of the first mainstream blockbusters with a gay couple as the lead characters, embodies a postcolonial dream. In the film based on Hanif Kureishi’s screenplay, punk Johnny, played by Daniel Day-Lewis and formerly part of a racist skinhead gang in the south of London, falls in love with his old classmate Omar, a Pakistani. Together they open a glamorous laundromat in neoliberal Thatcher England and defend themselves against racist and homophobic hostilities. In the end Johnny is brutally beaten up by his old gang, but the relationship, or rather the mutual attraction, is stronger than hatred. In Kureishi’s play, gay erotic desire is a revolutionary energy that overcomes not only racism and moral prejudice, but also class differences. While Omar comes from an educated, wealthy Pakistani family, Johnny is a proletarian. Homosexuality, or “sex with the same kind,” not only applies to the same gender, it also makes us the same.

Of course, there were numerous precursors to this idea in modernism, ranging from E.M. Forster’s novel Maurice, written in 1914 and published posthumously in 1971, in which a man from the British upper middle-class falls in love with a proletarian gamekeeper, to Jean Genet’s notorious film Chant d’amour (1950). In the latter, it is Arab and African prison inmates guarded by a white man who, through their gay and ultimately autoerotic desire, free themselves from the hopeless position assigned to them by society. But what made Stephen Frear’s film so surprising and subversive at the dawn of the worldwide AIDS crisis was not only the fact that it breaks taboos, that a brown and a white man fall in love. It was the playfulness, casualness, and above all the lust with which this subversive energy breaks fresh ground in everyday life, as well as the success of the film with a broad audience, which aroused hope for different times.

Thirty-five years later, it is not only films, such as God’s Own Country (2017), in which a British farm worker and a Syrian refugee fall in love, that are considerably more melodramatic. Great Britain is in the throes of Brexit; Schengen Europe, which is decaying inwardly, resembles a fortress on the outside; and the Mediterranean Sea has become a mass grave for refugees from Africa. The symbolic lightness in Frear’s film, which perhaps could have been read as a progressive harbinger of globalization and a coming to terms with the colonial past, has long since vanished. And, after all, there isn’t much cause for joy, inasmuch as white supremacy is on the rise again in the USA and throughout Europe. It is precisely in these times that Soufiane Ababri, who was born in the year in which Frear’s film was made, takes up this almost forgotten political driving force of gay desire—a force that redefines not only our own identity, but also our notions of class, nationality, and origin.

In recent years, the artist, who lives in Tangier and Paris, has created a semibiographical, graphic, and performative oeuvre that incorporates both his own experience and a wide variety of sources, including literature, theory, film, music, magazine excerpts, pictures from social platforms, and his own photos. Ababri is a visual, very personal commentator and activist who engages with ideas of Arab and European masculinity and his own desires. But he is also an archivist who records the history of the gay movement from James Baldwin to the present day and integrates it into the context of postcolonial discourses.

Something New Under The Little Prince’s Body, his first solo exhibition at Dittrich & Schlechtriem, is based on a somewhat heretical fantasy. What would have happened, Ababri wonders, if the Little Prince from Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s eponymous story had met a hairy, naked Arab in the desert? Saint-Exupéry’s 1943 book, published during World War II, is generally interpreted as a literary fable about friendship and humanity, a critique of the decline of moral values in Western society. His Little Prince, having landed in the Northern Sahara, encounters only the French narrator, whose plane has crashed, and mystical speaking animals—but no natives. It is interesting to note that in the 1920s Saint-Exupéry, a pilot by training, was the station manager of a stopover airfield in Tarfaya in southern Morocco, where as part of his job he was involved in armed altercations with rebellious Berbers. In this colonial context, his book is a purely white fable. In his retelling Ababri defiles it, investigating the history of immigration to Europe and the struggles of the gay movement in France in the late 1960s, as well as his life as a gay Arab today.

“Please … could you draw me a sheep!” That is the famous first sentence that the Little Prince addresses to the sleeping author in Saint-Exupéry’s version. In Soufiane Ababri’s drawing series, his wish comes true. Yet the sheet is held by a naked, “brown” body. And where one would expect to see a sheep’s head, the gleaming head of a penis juts out from the wool, as an erotic allusion to circumcision, halal slaughter, and sacrifice. But who is sacrificing himself to whom? As the exhibition’s title suggests, the question of dominance is indeed operative: Which body lies under which other body, who fucks whom—or who desires to be penetrated by whom?

Ababri equates sexual with cultural dominance and submission. That he as an artist would also construe an inextricable linkage between the histories of postcolonial and homosexual as well as feminist liberation, declaring the one form of freedom to be dependent on the other, might seem odd given the oppression and persecution of gays and women’s rights activists in the Maghreb. It is less odd when one considers the fact that modernity and postwar modernism were not a European project alone but also an African one, that the biased projections of the former colonial powers must be countered by a new canon, a new narrative—an insight that has been accepted in the art world. Still, in broaching the question of the emancipation of Arab and, ultimately, also of European gays from racist role models, Ababri is an absolute pioneer in the art world. He adopts a position of emphatic powerlessness to tell stories of violence, domination, and marginalization. Quite literally—homosexual acts are still punishable by law in Morocco, homosexuality is virtually nonexistent in the public sphere, while internet platforms like grindr are not censored. Openly gay men are few and far between even in the art scene. To this day, the writer and director Abdellah Taïa, who lives in exile in Paris, remains the country’s only openly gay intellectual.

“Bedworks” is the title of the drawings which Ababri, who divides his time between Tangier and Paris, has been making since 2016, always executing them while lying in bed, as a reaction to the history of European painting from Orientalism to Modernism. During this period, a number of artworks showed female as well as exotic male bodies in the manner of harem slaves lying on a divan—available objects of desire. These works range from Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres’ famous paintings The Grand Odalisque (1814) and The Turkish Bath (1863) to the barely concealed homoerotic depictions of Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), the poster boy of French Orientalism. In paintings such as Black Bashi-Bazouk (1868-69) and Bashi-Bazouk Chief, Gérôme shows black and oriental men in the attire of Ottoman freebooters. Superficially staged as proud warriors, they are, however, lasciviously draped on cushions or shyly turn their heads away, like the women, who in nineteenth-century painting in general are staged as willing objects of desire.

Ababri also makes use of the frowned upon idea of the “primitive,” the “inferior,” in his choice of means. The preferred media of many artists of his generation are video, performance, and sculpture—especially in the context of “queer” or postcolonial debates. As a counterreaction to the academic canon, Ababri simply lies down and draws. He consciously foregoes a studio and gets back into bed, the most intimate place in the home, where people sleep, dream, and have sex. The bed is also a place of laziness, depression, and retreat.

The attitude of the pictures may be camp, and due to their simplicity and colorfulness they may even seem naïve. Yet Ababri’s works look enormously physical, extremely sexual. The postures and colors are extroverted and stylized, and the constellations in the works recall melodramas from the 1950s, but also Fassbinder’s early films and the exaggerated choreographies in Claire Denis’s foreign legionnaire drama Beau Travail (1999), in which legionnaires with naked upper bodies carry out strength exercises and endurance training. There’s hardly any dialogue in Denis’s film. Everything is dominated by the monologue of the narrator, who has to suppress his homosexual desire and also encode it in his movements and his physicality. Every movement counts, every nonverbal interaction. The bodies of the legionnaires become speechless vehicles that perform fetishized forms of “masculinity.”

The brown and white men in Ababri’s latest series appear similarly speechless and ritualized. There are pictures that allude directly to motifs from The Little Prince. They always involve a blond, white man and an Arab, who dominate, subdue, or hold each other in their arms in different configurations in the desert. But there are also drawings that simply depict erotic encounters between Arab and blond men in clubs, cafés, parks, or public toilets. There are tender moments in which a smiling Arab hands a blond a grapefruit, in which eye contact is made in restroom mirrors or at urinals. But Ababri also presents situations in which latent violence can be felt—you don’t know whether they are about to kiss, or whether someone is about to be beat up or raped. Many elements in the drawings, such as the sports gear, lumberjack shirts and polo shirts, cabin walls, stages, and slings, point to typical stagings of the leather and fetish scene or situations in relevant “interracial” pornography.

All the men in Ababri’s drawings, even if they are not sexually active, are aroused and have rosy cheeks, almost as though they had applied rouge. The conspicuous “blush” denotes the instant at which the other’s desire is recognized and the subject loses control of his body, of representation. The same can be said of the picture itself, which, in the conventional understanding of art is supposed to kindle desire yet always remain passive, stuck in a feminine role—as if it did not perceive or return the beholder’s gaze. Ababri shatters these conventions. His drawings know that they are being looked at—and so do the men who perform in them. At the same time, Ababri shows the Arab male body in passive, vulnerable, and autoerotic positions, indirectly alluding to the leftist gay movement and the role of the “front homosexuel d’action révolutionnaire” (FHAR). In the early 1970s, the group around the writer, philosopher, and activist Guy Hocquenghem responded to the Algerian war by calling for sexual encounters between French gays and Arab men, which they believed held emancipatory potential. By permitting themselves to be penetrated, FHAR claimed, white Frenchmen enabled their “Arab” partners to avenge the suffering that France had inflicted on their home countries. This argument, however, enshrined its own racist festishizing view of Arabs, imposing a role on them that, in the mode of sexual submission, merely reenacted the patriarchal gesture of imperial paternalism.

For Ababri, dominance and submission are interchangeable, the balance of power open. Which seems like great progress. At second glance, however, his works make it clear that this does not provide any real liberation either. My Beautiful Laundrette is a thing of the past. Ababri’s art is directed to the era of Grindr, Scruff, and Instagram, a culture in which WhatsApp groups for every drug, every fetish, form and dissolve at lightning speed, in which a gigantic sex and porn industry controls and markets our desires. In 1972, Guy Hocquenghem wrote in his manifesto Homosexual Desire: “There is a social mechanism forever wiping out the constant renewed traces of our buried desires. One simply has to think about what happens with an experience as widespread as masturbation to realize how powerful this mechanism is: everybody has masturbated, yet no one ever mentions it, not even to their closest friends.”

That’s not true anymore. Not only because today masturbation and pornography are talked about in every office, on every stand-up comedy show on Netflix. The “social mechanism” no longer erases the traces of our desire, but collects and markets them in the form of cookies. In the Western gay scene, there are no clear codes anymore. No one can really see online or at a club whether the Arabic-looking lumberjack or the Adidas daddy is a refugee, a third- or fourth-generation migrant, a hipster, an unemployed person, or an academic. On account of virtualization and digitization, more and more hybrid and homogenized images of identity are created, which do not conceal the suppressed desire, but incorporate it and make it desirable for others. The idea of a black man really giving it to a white racist can be quite titillating for a racist. And vice versa, though people don’t like to talk about this as much. Even a creative, liberal, dark-skinned activist can find it exciting to be dominated by a tall Aryan prince. Ababri’s works address this mutual recognition. The polarities are not always so extreme, but racism and nationalism, the question of skin color and descent, feature incredibly often in sexual experiments with dominance and submission. Of course, if these roles are cast off as some point, a surprising union can emerge, closeness can develop, perhaps even intimacy—or consensual sexual violence.

But such projections, which function in the calculated pornographic or sexual realm, have caused conflicts in real life. It is not only Éduard Louis’ celebrated novel History of Violence (2016), in which the author almost surgically dissects an intense night with a young Algerian Frenchman and the subsequent extremely violent, sexual assault , address this issue. For many openly or covertly gay refugees from the Maghreb or the Middle East, immersing themselves in gay “subculture” is not only liberating or identity building, but vital to survive in Europe, to find a partner, to obtain papers and a residency permit, or simply to make money. Descent becomes a class issue; economic and psychological pressure in everyday life is harder than any erotic fantasy. But Ababri’s drawings also examine this matter. Gay erotic desire is not only a revolutionary, unifying energy, but also means exhaustion, obsession, repetition. At times, it’s almost psychotic. Some figures seem completely dislocated and spent in their sexuality, as though they have a movement disorder. The pink rings under their eyes suggest something like overexcitation, inner flammability, the desire to surrender completely.

The pink under the eyes also recalls the colored pencils children use to draw “white” skin. It’s the same color Ababri had the walls painted for his exhibition Something New Under The Little Prince’s Body—the same powdery flesh tone is found in pantyhose, erotic and orthopedic underwear, bandages, and makeup. The color evokes associations with skin, injuries, and cosmetic camouflage. In the exhibition, all visitors are immersed in the light of this “white” skin color, which creates a link to The Little Prince. At the same time, Ababri has a dark-haired Turkish and a boyish blond actor wearing flesh-colored fetish jerseys appear in a performance on the opening evening. This “second skin” is so wafer thin that the actors appear to be actually naked and simultaneously completely artificial, like Barbie dolls. Both the “Arab” and the “Little Prince” begin to circle around each other, approach each other, rub against each other, embrace each other, push their pelvis forward like during sex, wrestle. In between, they read a passage from Uses Of The Erotic by Audre Lorde, an essay published in 1978 in which the poet and feminist activist developed a female, spiritual alternative to male eroticism. In the piece, she speaks of a deep fulfillment that goes far beyond sexual and pornographic representation: “The erotic is the nurturer or nursemaid of all our deepest knowledge. For the erotic is not a question only of what we do; it is a question of how acutely and fully we can feel in the doing.” But this depth is denied the two performers, who despite all their desires do not really find each other or themselves. Alone in a corner, with their backs to the audience, they sing some fragile tunes that are connected to the artist and his lover: You Can Sleep In My Bed, a song by the Belgian electropop band Vive La Fête (2017), and Adımız Miskindir Bizim, a 1972 piece by the Turkish rock duo Mazhar-Fuat.

This delicate balance between desire and isolation, experience and projection runs through all of Ababri’s “Bedworks.” Here, the reality of repressed sexuality, which in Morocco can only take place “invisibly” in parks, apartments, or restrooms, meets the activism of gay emancipation movements from the late 1960s through punk and the AIDS crisis to the present day. Again and again, Ababri refers to books, films, and records that are important to him. In a picture made from a snapshot, a blond man at a flea market stall leafs through a record box. Clearly visible are LPs by Klaus Nomi (the great camp wave idol of the early 1980s), Sun Ra (the great Afrofuturist), and Rachid Taha, who founded the first Arab punk band in the 1980s. Ababri’s drawings speak of his éducation sentimentale, of real and fictitious encounters. Almost like a diary, he shows how the most diverse knowledge accumulates in his hybrid identity, about foreign bodies as well as about the canon of Western gay subculture, the literary world, and the art world. In performances, Ababri has referred to Derek Jarman’s last film Blue (1993), which he produced when he was almost blind before dying of AIDS. He draws gay icons from the Facebook pages of the Internet project The Aids Memorial. In his pictures, he associates himself with the thinking of the 1960s and 1970s gay movements, with gay philosophers such as Roland Barthes and Michel Foucault. He appropriates a past history, which was perhaps still completely foreign to him as a young person in Morocco. In his current works, he virtuously interweaves it with an idealized, Genet-like sexuality that could have originated in turbulent pre-AIDS times. One would like to think that Ababri is in search of the lost revolution. In fact, he also depicts the reality of the prep generation, which can only experience past hedonism with the help of preventive drugs and experience the past revolutions in the form of appropriation. This void must be filled in the truest sense of the word. Ababri does this with incredible obsession. He eroticizes and sexualizes the political to the max, and not only from a safe artistic distance. That’s what sets him apart. One senses a tremendous, authentic longing in his drawings: for the next cock, the next revolution.

OLIVER KOERNER VON GUSTORF is a freelance art critic and lives in Berlin and Ringenwalde, Uckermark. He writes for BLAU, Monopol, Architectual Digest, Weltkunst and others.

Nicht zufällig verkörpert Stephen Frears Film Mein wunderbarer Waschsalon (1985), einer der ersten Mainstream-Blockbuster, der ein schwules Paar zu seinen Protagonisten macht, auch einen postkolonialen Traum. In dem von Hanif Kureishis gleichnamigen Theaterstück adaptierten Film verliebt sich der von Daniel Day-Lewis gespielte Punk Johnny, der früher zu einer rassistischen Skinhead-Gang im Londoner Süden gehörte, in seinen alten Klassenkamerad Omar, einen Pakistani. Gemeinsam eröffnen sie im neoliberalen Thatcher-England einen glamourösen Waschsalon und wehren sich gegen rassistische und homophobe Anfeindungen. Am Ende wird Johnny von seiner alten Gang brutal zusammengeschlagen, doch die Beziehung, oder besser, die gegenseitige Anziehung, ist stärker als der Hass. In Kureishis Stück ist das schwule erotische Begehren eine revolutionäre Energie, die nicht nur Rassismus und moralische Vorurteile, sondern auch Klassenunterschiede überwindet. Omar stammt aus einer gebildeten, wohlhabenden pakistanischen Familie, Johnny ist Proletarier. Die Homosexualität, die „Gleichgeschlechtlichkeit“ gilt nicht nur dem Gleichen, sondern sie macht auch gleich.

Natürlich gibt es seit der Moderne zahlreiche Vorläuferbeispiele für diese Idee. Das reicht von E.M. Forsters 1914 geschriebenem und 1971 posthum veröffentlichtem Roman Maurice, in dem sich ein Mann aus der gehobenen britischen Mittelschicht in einen proletarischen Wildhüter verliebt, bis zu Jean Genets berühmt-berüchtigtem Film Chant d’amour (1950). Hier sind es die von einem Weißen bewachten arabischen und afrikanischen Gefängnisinsassen, die sich durch ihr schwules und letztendlich autoerotisches Begehren aus der aussichtslosen Position befreien, die die Gesellschaft ihnen zugewiesen hat. Was aber Stephen Frears Film damals gerade beim Anbruch der weltweiten Aids-Krise so überraschend und subversiv machte, war nicht lediglich der Tabubruch, dass ein brauner und ein weißer Mann sich verlieben. Es war die Verspieltheit, Beiläufigkeit und vor allem die Geilheit, mit der sich diese subversive Energie im Alltag Bahn bricht, der Erfolg des Films bei einem breiten Publikum, die auf andere Zeiten hoffen ließen.

35 Jahre später sind nicht nur die Filme, wie etwa God’s Own Country (2017), in dem sich ein britischer Farmarbeiter und ein syrischer Flüchtling verlieben, erheblich melodramatischer. Großbritannien befindet sich im Brexit, das nach innen zerfallende Schengen-Europa gleicht außen einer Festung, das Mittelmeer ist zum Massengrab für aus Afrika Geflüchtete geworden. Die symbolische Leichtigkeit in Frears Film, die man vielleicht als progressiven Vorboten der Globalisierung und Aufarbeitung von kolonialer Vergangenheit hätte lesen können, ist längst verflogen. Es gibt auch nicht viel Anlass zur Freude: In den USA und ganz Europa ist die weiße Vorherrschaft wieder auf dem Vormarsch. Gerade in diesen Zeiten nimmt sich Soufiane Ababri, der in dem Jahr geboren wurde, als Frears Film entstand, dieser fast vergessenen politischen Kraft des schwulen Begehrens an – einer Kraft, die nicht nur die eigene Identität, sondern auch unsere Begriffe von Klasse, Nationalität und Herkunft neu definiert.

Der zwischen Tanger und Paris lebende Künstler hat in den letzten Jahren ein semi-biografisches, zeichnerisches und performatives Werk geschaffen, in das sowohl das eigene Erleben als auch die unterschiedlichsten Quellen einfließen: Literatur, Theorie, Film, Musik, Magazinausrisse, Bilder von sozialen Plattformen, eigene Fotos. Ababri ist dabei ein visueller, sehr persönlicher Kommentator und Aktivist, der sich mit den Vorstellungen arabischer und europäischer Männlichkeit und dem eigenen Begehren auseinandersetzt. Er ist aber auch ein Archivar, der ebenso die Geschichte der Schwulenbewegung von James Baldwin bis in die Gegenwart festhält und in den Kontext postkolonialer Diskurse einbindet.

Something New Under The Little Prince’s Body, seine erste Einzelausstellung bei Dittrich & Schlechtriem, basiert auf einer etwas ketzerischen Fantasie. Was wäre, fragt Ababri, wenn der „Kleine Prinz“ aus Antoine de Saint-Exuperys gleichnamiger Erzählung in der Wüste auf einen behaarten, nackten Araber treffen würde? Saint-Exupérys 1943, noch im Zweiten Weltkrieg erschienenes Buch gilt gemeinhin als literarische Fabel über Freundschaft und Menschlichkeit, als Kritik am Werteverfall der westlichen Gesellschaft. Sein kleiner Prinz, der in der Nordsahara landet, trifft hier nur den in seinem Flugzeug abgestürzten französischen Ich-Erzähler und mystische sprechende Tiere – jedoch keine Einheimischen. Interessanterweise war der Pilot Saint-Exupéry Ende der 1920er-Jahre Leiter eines Zwischenlandeflugplatzes im südmarokkanischen Tarfaya, wo er auch rebellische Berber bekämpfte. Sein Buch erscheint in diesem kolonialen Zusammenhang also als eine rein weiße Fabel. Ababri macht daraus eine verunreinigte Nacherzählung, in die ebenso die Geschichte der Einwanderung nach Europa und die Kämpfe der Schwulenbewegung im Frankreich der späten 1960er einfließen wie sein Leben als schwuler Araber heute.

„Bitte … zeichne mir ein Schaf!“ Das ist der berühmte erste Satz, den der kleine Prinz in Antoine de Saint-Exupérys Fassung an den noch schlafenden Erzähler richtet. In Soufiane Ababris Zeichnungsserie wird ihm dieser Wunsch erfüllt. Allerdings wird das Blatt von einem nackten, „braunen“ Körper gehalten. Und dort, wo beim Schaf der Kopf sitzt, leuchtet eine blanke Eichel aus der Wolle hervor, als erotische Anspielung auf Beschneidung, Schächtung und Opferung. Doch wer opfert sich hier dem anderen? Wie der Titel der Ausstellung andeutet, geht es tatsächlich um Dominanz und die Frage, welcher Körper unter wem liegt, wer wen fickt – oder wer von wem als penetrierend begehrt wird.

Ababri setzt sexuelle und kulturelle Dominanz und Unterwerfung gleich. Dass er als Künstler auch die Geschichten postkolonialer und homosexueller wie feministischer Befreiung untrennbar miteinander verbindet, quasi die eine Freiheit von der anderen abhängig macht, erscheint angesichts der Unterdrückung und Verfolgung von Schwulen und Frauenrechtlerinnen im Maghreb zunächst erstaunlich. Und das, obwohl sich im Kunstkontext schon längst die Idee durchgesetzt hat, dass die Moderne und Nachkriegsmoderne nicht nur ein europäisches, sondern auch ein afrikanisches Projekt waren, dass den einseitigen Projektionen der ehemaligen Kolonialmächte ein neuer Kanon, eine neue Narration entgegengesetzt werden muss. Im Hinblick auf die Emanzipation der arabischen und letztendlich auch der europäischen Schwulen von rassistischen Rollenbildern ist Ababri im Kunstbetrieb ein absoluter Pionier. Dabei nimmt er eine Position der betonten Machtlosigkeit ein, um über Gewalt, Dominanz und Marginalisierung zu erzählen. Das ist wortwörtlich gemeint, denn in Marokko ist Homosexualität nach wie vor strafbar, sie existiert quasi nicht im öffentlichen Raum, während Internetplatformen wie grindr nicht zensiert werden. Offen Schwule findet man auch im Kulturbetrieb kaum. So ist der im Pariser Exil lebende Schriftsteller und Regisseur Abdellah Taïa der bislang einzige offen schwule Intellektuelle des Landes.

„Bedworks“ heißen Ababris Zeichnungen, die der zwischen Tanger und Paris pendelnde Künstler seit 2016 stets im Bett liegend anfertigt – als Reaktion auf die europäische Malereigeschichte vom Orientalismus bis in die Moderne. Denn die zeigte Frauenund auch exotische Männerkörper in der Manier von Haremssklavinnen auf einem Divan liegend, als verfügbare Objekte der Begierde. Das reicht von Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres‘ berühmten Gemälden Die große Odaliske (1814) oder Das Türkische Bad (1863) bis zu den kaum verhohlen homoerotischen Darstellungen von Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824-1904), dem Posterboy des französischen Orientalismus. Auf Gemälden wie Schwarzer Başı Bozuk (1868- 69) oder Ein Anführer der Başı Bozuk zeigt Gérôme schwarze und orientalisch anmutende Männer in der Tracht von osmanischen Freibeutern. Vordergründig als stolze Krieger in Szene gesetzt, sind sie allerdings lasziv auf Kissen drapiert oder wenden scheu den Kopf ab, wie die Frauen, die ansonsten in der Malerei des 19. Jahrhunderts als willige Objekte der Begierde inszeniert werden.

Die verpönte Vorstellung des „Primitiven“, „Unterlegenen“ übernimmt Ababri auch bei der Wahl seiner Mittel. Viele Künstler seiner Generation setzen auf Video, Performance oder Skulptur als bevorzugte Medien – gerade im Kontext Von „queeren“ oder postkolonialen Debatten. Als Gegenreaktion zum akademischen Kanon legt sich Ababri einfach hin und zeichnet. Bewusst verzichtet er auf ein Studio und zieht sich ins Bett zurück, an den intimsten Ort, an dem man schläft, träumt, Sex hat. Das Bett ist auch ein Ort der Faulheit, der Depression, des Rückzugs. Ababri verzichtet auf die Insignien „professioneller Kunst“. Er kauft seine Stifte im Supermarkt und entwickelt einen ganz direkten, regressiven Zeichenstil, den man auch aus der Outsider-Art,von Graffiti, Kritzeleien oder aus alten Pornografie- Heften kennt. Dadurch, dass er im Liegen auf einem Brett zeichnet, wird auf den Zeichnungen alles flach und perspektivlos, es gibt keine Tiefe, keine Hierarchien. Alles ist gleich bedeutsam oder bedeutungslos.

Die Attitüde der Bilder mag camp sein, in ihrer Einfachheit und Buntheit mögen sie vielleicht gar naiv anmuten. Dennoch wirken Ababris Arbeiten ungeheuer körperlich, extrem sexuell. Die Körperhaltungen und Farben sind extrovertiert und stilisiert, die Konstellationen auf den Bildern lassen an Melodramen aus den 1950er-Jahren, aber auch an die frühen Filme von Fassbinder oder die überh.hten Choreografien in Claire Denis‘ Fremdenlegionärsdrama Beau Travail (1999) denken, in dem Legionäre mit nacktem Oberkörper eine Choreografie aus Kraftübungen und Ausdauertraining absolvieren. In Denis‘ Film gibt es kaum Dialoge. Alles wird beherrscht vom Monolog des Erzählers, der sein homosexuelles Begehren unterdrücken und auch in seinen Bewegungen und seiner Körperlichkeit verschlüsseln muss. Es zählt jede Bewegung, jede nicht verbale Interaktion. Die Körper der Legionäre werden dabei zu sprachlosen Vehikeln, die fetischisierte Formen von „Männlichkeit“ aufführen.

Ähnlich sprachlos und ritualisiert erscheinen auch die braunen und weißen Männer in Ababris jüngster Serie. Da sind Bilder, die ganz direkt auf Motive aus dem Kleinen Prinzen anspielen. Stets sind ein blonder, weißer Mann und ein Araber involviert, die sich in verschiedenen Konstellationen in der Wüste gegenseitig dominieren, unterwerfen oder in den Armen halten. Es gibt aber auch Zeichnungen, die ganz einfach von erotischen Begegnungen zwischen arabischen und blonden Männern in Clubs, Cafés, Parks oder auf Klappen berichten. Es finden sich zarte Momente, in denen ein lächelnder Araber einem Blonden eine Pampelmuse reicht, in denen sich Blicke in Toilettenspiegeln oder an Pissoirs kreuzen. Ababri zeigt aber auch Situationen, Herzen der Gewalt (2016), in dem der Autor eine intensive Nacht mit einem jungen algerischen Franzosen und den anschließenden extrem gewaltsamen Raubüberfall fast chirurgisch seziert. Für viele offen oder verdeckt schwule Geflüchtete aus dem Maghreb oder dem Nahen Osten ist das Eintauchen in die schwule „Subkultur“ nicht nur befreiend oder identitätsstiftend, sondern lebensnotwendig, um in Europa durchzukommen, einen Partner, Papiere, Bleiberecht zu finden oder ganz einfach an Geld zu kommen. Die Herkunft wird zur Klassenfrage, der ökonomische und psychologische Druck im Alltag ist härter als jede erotische Fantasie. Aber auch davon erzählen Ababris Zeichnungen. Das schwule erotische Begehren ist nicht nur eine revolutionäre, vereinigende Energie, sondern auch Erschöpfung, Obsession, Wiederholung. Es hat manchmal etwas fast Psychotisches. Manche Figuren wirken in ihrer Sexualität völlig verrenkt und verausgabt, wie bei einem Veitstanz. Die pinken Ringe unter den Augen der Akteure deuten fast so etwas wie eine Übererregung, eine innere Entflammbarkeit an, den Wunsch sich ganz und gar auszuliefern.

Das Pink unter den Augen gleicht aber auch der Buntstiftfarbe, die Kinder benutzen, um „weiße“ Haut zu zeichnen. Es ist dieselbe Farbe, in der Ababri die Wände für seine Ausstellung Something New Under The Little Prince’s Body hat streichen lassen – derselbe pudrige Fleischton kommt in Strumpfhosen, erotischer und orthopädischer Unterwäsche, Pflasterstreifen, Make-Up vor. Die Farbe weckt Assoziationen von Haut, Verletzungen, kosmetischer Camouflage. In der Ausstellung sind sämtliche Besucher in das Licht dieser “weißen” Hautfarbe getaucht, die sich mit dem Kleinen Prinzen verbindet. Zugleich lässt Ababri am Eröffnungsabend einen dunkelhaarigen türkischen und einen jungenhaften blonden Akteur in fleischfarbenen Fetisch-Trikots in einer Performance auftreten. Diese „zweite Haut“ ist so hauchdünn, dass die Akteure faktisch nackt und zugleich völlig künstlich, wie Barbiepuppen wirken. Beide, der „Araber“ und der „Kleine Prinz“, beginnen, sich zu umkreisen, nähern sich an, reiben sich aneinander, umarmen sich, stoßen die Becken wie beim Sex vor, ringen. Zwischendurch lesen sie eine Passage aus Uses Of The Erotic von Audre Lorde vor, einem 1978 veröffentlichten Essay, in dem die Dichterin und feministische Aktivistin einen weiblichen, spirituellen Gegenentwurf zur männlich besetzten Erotik entwickelte. Darin spricht sie von einer tiefen Erfüllung, die weit über das Sexuelle und die Darstellung in der Pornografie hinausgeht: „Die Erotik ist die Ernährerin, die Amme für unser grundlegendstes Wissen. Denn die Erotik hängt nicht nur davon ab, was wir tun. Sie hängt davon ab, wie und was wir tatsächlich in diesem Tun fühlen können, wie es ganz und gar gefühlt werden kann.“3 Doch diese Tiefe bleibt den beiden Performern versagt, die bei allem Begehren nicht wirklich zusammen oder zu sich finden. Alleine in einer Ecke, dem Publikum den Rücken zugewandt, singen sie etwas brüchig Songs, die mit dem Künstler und seinem Geliebten verbunden sind: You Can Sleep In My Bed, einen Song der belgischen Elektropop-Band Vive La Fête (2017) und Adımız Miskindir Bizim, ein 1972 erschienenes Stück des türkischen Rock-Duos Mazhar-Fuat.

Diese fragile Balance zwischen Begehren und Isolation, Erleben und Projektion durchzieht sämtliche von Ababris „Bedworks“. Hier trifft die Realität einer unterdrückten Sexualität, die sich in Marokko nur „unsichtbar“ in Parks, Wohnungen oder Toiletten abspielen kann, auf den Aktivismus der schwulen Emanzipationsbewegungen von den späten 1960er-Jahren über Punk und die AIDS-Krise bis in die Gegenwart. Immer wieder verweist Ababri auf Bücher, Filme und Platten, die für ihn wichtig sind. Auf einem Bild, das nach einem Schnappschuss entstand, blättert ein blonder Mann an einem Flohmarktstand in einer Plattenbox. Deutlich sichtbar sind LPs von Klaus Nomi (dem großen, campen Wave-Idol der frühen 1980er), Sun Ra (dem großen Afrofuturisten) und Rachid Taha, der in den 1980ern die erste arabische Punk-Band gründete. Zeichnerisch erzählt Ababri von seiner Éducation sentimentale, von realen und fiktiven Begegnungen. Fast tagebuchartig zeigt er, wie sich in seiner hybriden Identität das unterschiedlichste Wissen ansammelt – um fremde Körper ebenso wie um den Kanon der westlichen schwulen Subkultur, der Literatur- und der Kunstwelt. Ababri bezog sich in Performances auf Derek Jarmans letzten Film Blue (1993), den er fast erblindet produzierte, bevor er an Aids starb. Er zeichnet schwule Ikonen von den Facebook-Seiten des Internetprojekts The Aids Memorial ab, er setzt sich auf seinen Bildern mit dem Denken der schwulen Bewegungen der 1960er- und 1970er-Jahre in Verbindung, mit schwulen Philosophen wie Roland Barthes und Michel Foucault. Es ist eine vergangene Geschichte, die er sich dort aneignet, die ihm als Jugendlichen in Marokko vielleicht noch völlig fremd war. Auf seinen Bildern verflechtet er sie heute virtuos mit einer idealisierten, Genet-haften Sexualität, die aus bewegten Vor-Aids-Zeiten stamen könnte. Man möchte denken, Ababri sei auf der Suche nach der verlorenen Revolution. Tatsächlich schildert er auch die Realität der Prep-Generation, die den vergangenen Hedonismus nur mithilfe präventiv eingenommenerer Medikamente erleben und die Revolutionen von einst nur als Appropriation erfahren kann. Diese Leere gilt es im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes zu füllen. Ababri tut das mit unglaublicher Obsession. Er erotisiert und sexualisiert das Politische bis an die Grenzen, und das nicht nur aus der sicheren künstlerischen Distanz. Das zeichnet ihn aus. Man spürt auf seinen Zeichnungen eine ungeheure, authentische Sehnsucht: nach dem nächsten Schwanz, der nächsten Revolution.

OLIVER KOERNER VON GUSTORF ist freier Kunstkritiker und lebt in Berlin und Ringenwalde, Uckermark. Er schreibt u. a. für BLAU, Monopol, Architectual Digest, Weltkunst.

Back to Exhibitions